Prostatectomy

Risks of Surgery

Risks of prostatectomy include:

  • Bowel incontinence (difficulty controlling bowel movements)
  • Urinary incontinence (difficulty controlling urine)
  • Impotence (erection problems)
  • Rectum injury
  • Tightening of the urinary opening due to scar tissue (urethral stricture)

Before The Procedure

You will have a thorough physical exam and may need other tests. Your team will make certain that medical problems like diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart or lung problems are managed before the procedure.

English

Prostatectomy

What is Prostatectomy?

Prostatectomy is a surgical procedure for the removal of all or part of the prostate gland. The operation is done because of an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia), as well as for prostate cancer and other cancers of the pelvis that cause urinary retention.

Prostatectomy, Prostate Cancer

 

English

Septoplasty

Recovery after Septoplasty

Septoplasty is generally accomplished as an outpatient procedure which means you can go home on the same day after the influence of anesthesia has worn off.

Your nose will likely be swollen, painful, and packed with cotton to stop bleeding. The packing will be taken a day or two after surgery.

Limiting vigorous physical activities will help minimize swelling and promote healing. Your physician will prescribe pain medications in case you need one.

English

Septoplasty

Preparing for the Procedure

You may be requested to quit taking certain medicines a week preceding your surgery, including headache medicine, ibuprofen, and blood thinners. This will eliminate the danger of bleeding amid the surgery.

Your specialist may take photos of your nose before the surgery. A "before, and after" photo can serve as a helpful indicator of results.

English

Total Knee Replacement

Recovery

Recovery times vary from patient to patient depending on the individual’s health and the type of surgery. It is best to comply with the instructions given by your surgeon regarding knee care after the procedure.

After the surgery, your nurse will take care of you in your room specially managing your pain and following your surgeon’s orders.

There will be a significant amount of dressing on your knee to protect your wound. Drains will be positioned at the surgical site to help empty excess fluid inside the wound.

English

Total Knee Replacement

Partial or Half Knee Replacement

If you only have one damaged knee, you will need a partial or half knee replacement. This procedure uses a smaller incision and has less bone being removed. It is an ideal procedure for one in four individuals with osteoarthritis.

Half knee replacements require a shorter hospital stay and recovery period. Blood transfusions maybe rarely needed. Also, this procedure generally results in more natural knee movement so you can be more active compared to a total knee replacement surgery.

English

Total Knee Replacement

In a total knee replacement, both of your knee joints are replaced. It usually takes 2 – 3 hours for the procedure to finish.

Your surgeon creates an incision in front of your knee exposing the knee cap. It is then moved to the side so the surgeon can access the knee joint behind it.

English

Total Hip Replacement

How Your New Hip Is Different

You will feel a certain amount of numbness in the skin around the incision. You will also feel some stiffness, specially with excessive bending. These issues usually disappear with time and almost all patients find these are small in contrast to the pain and restricted functionality they experience before the surgery.

English

Total Hip Replacement

What Does Hip Replacement Surgery Involve?

The hip joint is situated where the upper end of the femur (thigh bone) meets the pelvis (hip bone). A ball at the end of the femur, called the femoral head, corresponds to a socket (acetabulum) in the pelvis to enable a wide range of motion. Please refer to the figure below.

English

Pages

Subscribe to Yanhee Hospital RSS